Interventional radiology gains subspecialty status in Canada

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Andrew Benko
Andrew Benko

Recognising interventional radiology as a subspecialty of radiology formally acknowledges the discipline’s importance, increases the field’s credibility, strengthens the voice of interventional radiology and improves support for the field.

The Committee on Specialties, the Education Committee and the Executive Council all voted on the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association’s application, the CIRA website announces. Interventional radiology is already recognised as a subspecialty in Europe and other countries including the UK, Australia and the USA.

 

A news announcement on the CIRA website quoted Andrew Benko, CIRA president, as saying: “This recognition shows how interventional radiology has moved from a technical discipline to a true clinical discipline. Interventional radiology has a unique practice profile and body of knowledge making it distinct from diagnostic radiology and other medical specialties. The interventional radiology community is mature, vibrant and continues to grow across the world and in Canada. It has its own journals, meetings and research. Recognition by the RCPSC as a formal subspecialty of diagnostic radiology will help the field to continue to mature both clinically and academically.”

Recognising interventional radiology as a subspecialty of radiology formally acknowledges the discipline’s importance, increases the field’s credibility, strengthens the voice of interventional radiology and improves support for the field. It will also standardise and improve the quality of training across Canada and implement formal clinical training in the different programmes. This will “permit better patient care and allow for further advancements in medicine,” Benko adds.

The CIRA website also notes that the Royal College will accredit the interventional radiology residency programmes at Canadian universities, and produce and administer the national certification exams. The proposed training period for interventional radiology is two years, which would consist of 18 months in interventional radiology (including technical and clinical training) and six months of cross-sectional imaging relevant to interventional radiology. The total length of training for most candidates would therefore be six years, but this would allow additional interventional radiology and clinical training. “The global result will be a standardisation of training and accreditation in interventional radiology in order to ensure that certified interventional radiologists will have the necessary skills to evaluate, treat and manage patients,” Benko says.

 

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